The Prodigal Son

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Had a client awhile back commission this illustration to use in some seminars he does for pretty big corporations. Wasn’t quite sure how this particular Bible story fit in with what he does, but I’ve always liked this parable, so I figure it would be fun to draw. I like doing B&W sometimes like this.

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3 thoughts on “The Prodigal Son

  1. lol. I got curious too, on how this fit with the particular bible story.. I copied & pasted the below from Wikipedia. lol. ^_^This drawing looks like it fits on #3 below. (b.t.w. LOVE the drawing! Nice work.. with the dirt on the son, and the expression/body language of the father running toward him with open-arms in celebration.) 1. The parable begins with a young man, the younger of two sons, who asks his father to give him his share of the estate. The parable continues by describing how the younger son travels to a distant country and wastes all his money in wild living. When a famine strikes, he becomes desperately poor and is forced to take work as a swineherd. When he reaches the point of envying the pigs he is looking after, he finally comes to his senses: "When he came to his senses, he said, 'How many of my father's hired men have food to spare, and here I am starving to death! I will set out and go back to my father and say to him: Father, I have sinned against heaven and against you. I am no longer worthy to be called your son; make me like one of your hired men.' "So he got up and went to his father. But while he was still a long way off, his father saw him and was filled with compassion for him; he ran to his son, threw his arms around him and kissed him." – Luke 15:17-20, NIV2. The son does not even have time to finish his rehearsed speech, since the father calls for his servants to dress him in a fine robe, a ring, and sandals, and slaughter the "fattened calf" for a celebratory meal. The older son, who was at work in the fields, hears the sound of celebration, and is told about the return of his younger brother. He is not impressed, and becomes angry: "But he answered his father, 'Look! All these years I've been slaving for you and never disobeyed your orders. Yet you never gave me even a young goat so I could celebrate with my friends. But when this son of yours who has squandered your property with prostitutes comes home, you kill the fattened calf for him!'" – Luke 15:29-30, NIV3. The parable concludes with the father explaining that because the younger son had returned, in a sense, from the dead, celebration was necessary: "But we had to celebrate and be glad, because this brother of yours was dead and is alive again; he was lost and is found.' " – Luke 15:32, NIV

  2. lol. I got curious too, on how this fit with the particular bible story.. I copied & pasted the below from Wikipedia. lol. ^_^This drawing looks like it fits on #3 below. (b.t.w. LOVE the drawing! Nice work.. with the dirt on the son, and the expression/body language of the father running toward him with open-arms in celebration.) 1. The parable begins with a young man, the younger of two sons, who asks his father to give him his share of the estate. The parable continues by describing how the younger son travels to a distant country and wastes all his money in wild living. When a famine strikes, he becomes desperately poor and is forced to take work as a swineherd. When he reaches the point of envying the pigs he is looking after, he finally comes to his senses: "When he came to his senses, he said, 'How many of my father's hired men have food to spare, and here I am starving to death! I will set out and go back to my father and say to him: Father, I have sinned against heaven and against you. I am no longer worthy to be called your son; make me like one of your hired men.' "So he got up and went to his father. But while he was still a long way off, his father saw him and was filled with compassion for him; he ran to his son, threw his arms around him and kissed him." – Luke 15:17-20, NIV2. The son does not even have time to finish his rehearsed speech, since the father calls for his servants to dress him in a fine robe, a ring, and sandals, and slaughter the "fattened calf" for a celebratory meal. The older son, who was at work in the fields, hears the sound of celebration, and is told about the return of his younger brother. He is not impressed, and becomes angry: "But he answered his father, 'Look! All these years I've been slaving for you and never disobeyed your orders. Yet you never gave me even a young goat so I could celebrate with my friends. But when this son of yours who has squandered your property with prostitutes comes home, you kill the fattened calf for him!'" – Luke 15:29-30, NIV3. The parable concludes with the father explaining that because the younger son had returned, in a sense, from the dead, celebration was necessary: "But we had to celebrate and be glad, because this brother of yours was dead and is alive again; he was lost and is found.' " – Luke 15:32, NIV

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